Radio

April 02, 2019

Daydreaming about an interesting idea can yield creative insights, a process Jonathan Schooler calls mind-wondering, rather than mind-wandering.

 

December 12, 2018

Musings in this mind meld

How Dr. Schooler found himself researching consciousness and the mind

The phenomenon of false memory

The hard problem of consciousness 

What consciousness is, isn’t and might be

Dr. Schooler’s “resonance” hypothesis and the importance of “frequency”

Is consciousness intrinsic to the universe or just anchored to matter?

Possible techniques to improve your ability to recall information more effectively

January 29, 2018

It's a workday, just after lunch. You have a deadline and there's plenty of time left in the day to get the task done. If only you could stop thinking about other things. One thought can lead to your mind just...wandering away. This can't be good, right? You've probably been scolded as a kid for daydreaming in class. But in recent years, neuroscientists and psychologists have found that there are some very redeeming qualities to this mental state - in fact, it could be an essential cognitive skill. Here's an excerpt from an interview conducted with one of those researchers.

November 05, 2017

Dr. Schooler talks about mind-wandering, mindfulness, and creativity on Dr. Connie Corley's radio show.

January 19, 2017

Being called a daydreamer, especially as an adult, often has negative connotations. But researchers at the University of California, Santa Barbara have been studying the value of what they call ‘mind wandering’. Jonathan Schooler, a professor of psychological and brain sciences has been looking specifically at creative scientists and creative writers to see when they have creative ideas.

May 03, 2011

In this short, Jonathan Schooler tells us about a discovery that launched his career and led to a puzzle that has haunted him ever since.

In the late 1980s, when Jonathan Schooler was a graduate student in psychology, he did a little study that became a big deal. Schooler asked a group of people to watch a video of a man robbing a bank. After watching the video, he had half of them jot down a description of the robber. And, wait for it ... turns out that the people who took notes were significantly LESS likely to recognize the robber later.