Publications

Found 249 results
Author Title [ Type(Desc)] Year
Journal Article
Franklin M.S., Smallwood J., Zedelius C.M., Broadway J., Schooler J.W..  2016.  Unaware yet reliant on attention: Experience sampling reveals that mind-wandering impedes implicit learning.. Psychonomic Bulletin and Review. 23(1):223-229.
Baird B., Smallwood J., Fishman D.J., Mrazek M., Schooler J.W..  2013.  Unnoticed intrusions: Dissociations of meta-consciousness in thought suppression. Consciousness and Cognition. 22(3):1003-1012.
Schooler J.  2011.  Unpublished results hide the decline effect. Nature. 470(7335):437.
Vohs KD, Schooler J.W.  2008.  The Value of Believing in Free Will: Encouraging a Belief in Determinism Increases Cheating. Psychological science. 19(1):49–54.
Schooler J.W..  1989.  Varieties of memory and consciousness: Essays in Honour of Endel Tulving. Applied Cognitive Psychology. 4:536-537.
Schooler J.W., Engstler-Schooler T.Y..  1990.  Verbal overshadowing of visual memories: Some things are better left unsaid. Cognitive Psychology. 22(1):36-71.
Fallshore M, Schooler J.W.  1995.  Verbal vulnerability of perceptual expertise.. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition. 21(6):1608-23.
Schooler J.W..  2002.  Verbalization produces a transfer inappropriate processing shift. Applied Cognitive Psychology. 16(8):989–997.
Casner SM, Schooler JW.  2015.  Vigilance impossible: diligence, distraction, and daydreaming all lead to failures in a practical monitoring task. Consciousness and cognition. 35:33–41.
Creswell KG, Sayette MA, Schooler JW, Wright AGC, Pacilio LE.  2016.  Visceral States Call for Visceral Measures: Verbal Overshadowing of Hunger Ratings Across Assessment Modalities.. Assessment. 25(2):173-182.
Seli P., Maillet D, Schacter DL, Kane MJ, Smallwood J, Schooler JW, Smilek D.  2017.  What does (and should) “mind wandering” mean?
Zedelius C.M., Protzko J., Broadway J.M., Schooler J.W..  2020.  What types of daydreaming predict creativity? Laboratory and experience sampling evidence. Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts.
Murray S., Krasich K., Schooler J.W., Seli P..  2019.  What's in a task? Complications in the study of the task-unrelated-thought (TUT) variety of mind wandering. Perspectives on Psychological Science. 15(3):572-588.
Smallwood J., McSpadden M., Schooler J.W..  2008.  When attention matters: the curious incident of the wandering mind. Memory and Cognition. 36(6):1144-1150.
Brown C, Brandimonte MA, Wickham LHV, Bosco A, Schooler JW.  2014.  When do words hurt? A multiprocess view of the effects of verbalization on visual memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition. 40(5):1244-1256.
Gable S.L, Hopper E.A, Schooler J.W.  2019.  When the Muses Strike: Creative Ideas of Physicists and Writers Routinely Occur During Mind Wandering. Psychological Science. 30(3):396-404.
Schooler J.W., Wilson T.W..  1991.  When words hurt: The disruptive effects of verbally analyzing reasons. Proceedings of the Society for Consumer Psychology. 29
Loftus E.F, Banaji M., Schooler J.W, Foster R.A.  1987.  Who remembers what: Gender differences in memory. Michigan Quarterly Review. 26:64-85.
Ryan R.S., Schooler J.W..  1998.  Whom do words hurt? Individual differences in susceptibility to verbal overshadowing Applied Cognitive Psychology. 12:105-125.
Schooler J.W., Douglas S..  1999.  Why creativity is not like the proverbial typing monkey. Psychological Inquiry. 10(4):351-356.
Chin J.M., Schooler J.W..  2009.  Why do words hurt? content, process, and criterion shift accounts of verbal overshadowing European Journal of Cognitive Psychology. 20
Franklin MS, Broadway JM, Mrazek MD, Smallwood J, Schooler JW.  2013.  Window to the Wandering Mind: Pupillometry of Spontaneous Thought While Reading. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology. 66(12):2289-2294.
Mrazek MD, Phillips DT, Franklin MS, Broadway JM, Schooler JW.  2013.  Young & restless: Validation of the Mind-Wandering Questionnaire (MWQ) reveals disruptive impact of mind-wandering for youth. Frontiers in Psychology. 4:560.

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